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20121202
20121210
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of the excheck kerr. >> mr. speaker, it's taking time, but the british economy is healing. [laughter] after the biggest financial crash of our lifetime, people know that we face each problem at home and abroad. at home we live with the decades of debt and the failure to equip britain to compete in the modern world. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as,
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and shipbuilding and shipping and ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran, of that regime, is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder
in one area for economy of force. they're going to be dispersed to be effective, and that requires a lot more presence. it depends on how scoped i think our national command authority says this is exactly what i want you to do with the mission set. that'll probably drive, okay, it won't be guys like me, it'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions
economy, every developing economy that is not hydrocarbon rich. and you're absolutely right, there is a confluence of interests between russia and iran. these two countries form a north/south axis whereas kazahkstan, turkmenistan and countries all the way east to china and western europe or europe comprise an east/west axis, the corridor through which oil, gas but also industrial goods, ideas and information can flow. um, the russian situation is not dissimilar. the russian situation in europe with gas is similar to iranian or saudi situation with oil. it's all about market share. >> right. >> so if you have azerbaijanny gas, turkmen gas competing with european gas or russian gas, for that matter lng from algeria, it may drive the market share down, it may drive the prices down, and europe is really at a, at a crossroads because they need to decide whether to go with natural gas or continue with coal and continue with nuclear. so gas plays a strategic energy role in europe right now. and you asked about what can we do. >> that's the most important crux of all of -- >> trilli
the economy. >>host: how about getting rid of subsidies for farmers and corporations and big oil? >> look at the republican farm bill with bipartisan support gets rid of direct payments to farmers but also with reform on the other side with to stamp use is up 40% in two years in the middle of a recovery. 41 states had more food stamp expenditures last year over the year before. there are things to be had but in terms of subsidies it is not like they get a check kumbaya they get the same deduction but it is a different business and that is one of the things to help in the united states. so to encourage production here is a smart thing. i suspect those things are on the table but the big it loophole is the home mortgage and no taxes on health insurance and charitable giving are the big three. that will be the interesting debate. . .
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5